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U.S. Department of Transportation U.S. Department of Transportation Icon United States Department of Transportation United States Department of Transportation

Interpretation Response #PI-79-026 ([Energy Regulatory Commission] [E. Scott Smith])

Below is the interpretation response detail and a list of regulations sections applicable to this response.

Interpretation Response Details

Response Publish Date:

Company Name: Energy Regulatory Commission

Individual Name: E. Scott Smith

Location State: KY Country: US

View the Interpretation Document

Response text:

Mr. E. Scott Smith

Chief Engineer, Gas Section

Energy Regulatory Commission

Post Office Box 615

Frankfort, Kentucky 40602

Dear Mr. Smith:

Thank you for your letter of June 8, 1979, requesting an interpretation of the term "uprating." You inquire if increasing the pressure in a distribution line to 17 psi which had been in operation for 48 years at a pressure of 5 1/2 ounces can be classified as an "uprating."

The regulations prescribing requirements for uprating (Sections 192.555 and 192.557) are applicable to pipelines which are intended to operate at a pressure higher than the current
maximum allowable operating pressure established under 49 CFR 192.619. Therefore, if the established maximum allowable operating pressure for the line in question is less than 17 psi, then the line is subject to the uprating regulations of Subpart K.

I trust that this responds adequately to your inquiry.

Sincerely,

Cesar DeLeon

Associate Director for

Pipeline Safety Regulation

Materials Transportation Bureau

Regulation Sections

Section Subject
192.555 Uprating to a pressure that will produce a hoop stress of 30 percent or more of SMYS in steel pipelines